Biologic Behavior and optimal cut-off point estimation for Serum Fasting Insulin: A report from the Maracaibo City Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence Study

Autores/as

  • Joselyn Rojas
  • Abdón Toledo
  • Mervin Chávez
  • María Martínez
  • Maria Calvo
  • Adriana David
  • Carmen Chávez
  • Juan Salazar
  • Jesús Romero
  • Anilsa Amell
  • Edgardo Mengual
  • Carem Prieto
  • Carolina Escalona
  • Nailet Arraiz
  • Paola Valero
  • Manuel Velasco
  • Adonías Lubo
  • Maria Corina Gómez
  • Valmore Bermúdez

Palabras clave:

Insulin, Hyperinsulinemia, Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, Cut-Off point.

Resumen

Introduction: Insulin resistance is a metabolic state in which tissue effects of insulin are diminished, leading to hyperinsulinemia as a compensatory mechanism. The combination of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia constitutes one of the main pathophysiological landmarks of Metabolic Syndrome. Thus, our main objective was to determine a cut-off point for serum fasting insulin in the population of Maracaibo. Materials and Methods: Descriptive, cross-sectional study realized in 2,026 subjects of both genders, 18 years of age or older, who had their serum fasting insulin quantified. These values underwent logarithmic transformation for normalization of their distribution, which was corroborated through Geary’s test. Results were expressed as means ± SD. A cut-off was selected through the construction of ROC Curves using selected healthy and “sick” populations. Results: In the studied population (n=2,026) the mean serum fasting insulin concentration was 14.6±9.5 μU/mL. When stratifying by gender, a mean of 14.5±9.3 μU/ mL was observed in women and 14.8±9.8μU/mL in men; p=0.715. When assessing these levels by age groups, BMI and waist circumference, a progressive increase was observed along each category. The selected cut-off point for serum fasting insulin concentration was 13μU/mL; AUC=0.792; Sen=74.4%; Esp=71.3%. Conclusions: Serum fasting insulin concentrations increase with age, BMI and waist circumference. A cut-off point of 13μU/mL is suggested for the definition of fasting hyperinsulinemia in our population.

Biografía del autor/a

Joselyn Rojas

MD, MSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela.

Institute of Clinical Immunology.University of Los Andes. Mérida – Venezuela.

Abdón Toledo

MD

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Mervin Chávez

BSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

María Martínez

BSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Maria Calvo

BSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Adriana David

BSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Carmen Chávez

BSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Juan Salazar

MD

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela.

Jesús Romero

BSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Anilsa Amell

MSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Edgardo Mengual

MD, MPH, PhD

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela.

Carem Prieto

MSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Carolina Escalona

MSc

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Nailet Arraiz

PhD

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela.

Paola Valero

Lic 

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Manuel Velasco

MD, FRCP, PhD

Clinical Hypertension Unit. Vargas School of Medicine. Central University of Venezuela. Caracas, Venezuela.

Adonías Lubo

MD, MgSc, PhD

Work´s Medicine Institute. School of Medicine, University of Zulia, Maracaibo – Venezuela

Maria Corina Gómez

MgSc, PhD

Nutrition School. University of Zulia, Maracaibo - Venezuela

Valmore Bermúdez

MD, MgSc, MPH, PhD

Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine. The University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

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